The Ovaries and Poly Cystic Ovarian Disease (PCOS)

The ovaries are a pair of small, almond-shaped organs that are located in the pelvis, on each side of the uterus. The ovaries produce the eggs (ova) that travel through the fallopian tubes to the uterus, where they may be fertilized by sperm. The ovaries also produce the hormones estrogen and progesterone, which regulate the menstrual cycle, fertility, and pregnancy. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cell that can be found in many tissues, including the bone marrow, adipose tissue, and skin. MSCs have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into a variety of cell types, including osteoblasts (bone cells), chondrocytes (cartilage cells), and adipocytes (fat cells). MSCs are being studied for their potential use in the treatment of a variety of diseases and conditions, including osteoarthritis, diabetes, and heart disease.

 

Ovarian dysfunction is a widespread problem that can have a profound impact on a woman’s quality of life. It is estimated that one in every six women in the United States suffers from some form of ovarian dysfunction. The most common type of ovarian dysfunction is a polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), which affects approximately 5 million women in the United States. PCOS is a condition in which the ovaries produce too much of the hormone testosterone and fail to ovulate regularly. This can lead to a variety of symptoms, including irregular periods, excess hair growth, acne, and weight gain. While there is no cure for PCOS, there are treatments that can help manage the symptoms. One promising treatment is the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs are a type of stem cell that can be found in various tissues, including the bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord. MSCs have the ability to differentiate into a variety of cell types, including ovarian cells. This makes them a potentially valuable treatment for ovarian dysfunction. In a recent study, MSCs were isolated from the bone marrow of rats and injected into the ovaries of rats with PCOS. The MSCs were found to integrate into the ovarian tissue and differentiate into ovarian cells. This led to an increase in the number of eggs produced by the ovaries and a decrease in the levels of testosterone. This study shows that MSCs have the potential to be an effective treatment for ovarian dysfunction. MSCs are a promising treatment for ovarian dysfunction because they have the ability to differentiate into ovarian cells. This means that they could potentially replace the damaged or missing ovarian cells that are responsible for the symptoms of ovarian dysfunction. MSCs are also a promising treatment because they are readily available and can be isolated from a variety of tissues. This makes them a potential treatment for a wide range of patients. MSCs are a potentially valuable treatment for ovarian dysfunction, but more research is needed to determine their safety and efficacy. Clinical trials are currently underway to assess the safety and efficacy of MSCs in humans. If these trials are successful, MSCs could become a standard treatment for ovarian dysfunction.

 "Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) - Symptoms and causes." 8 Sep. 2022, https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pcos/symptoms-causes/syc-20353439. Accessed 24 Oct. 2022.

 "Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) - Johns Hopkins Medicine." https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/polycystic-ovary-syndrome-pcos. Accessed 24 Oct. 2022.

 "PCOS (Polycystic Ovary Syndrome) and Diabetes | CDC." https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/pcos.html. Accessed 24 Oct. 2022.

The information below is the recommended stem cell therapy protocol for this condition 

Route of AdministrationDoseTime (Days)Total Cells
IV50,000,0003150,000,000
Myers cocktail/NAD50,000,0001N/A
Peri Ovarian50,000,000150,000,000
Total200,000,000