Cell Death

cell death-A

Cell death is a process that occurs in all tissues and organs of the body. It is a normal and essential process for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and the prevention of disease. There are two main types of cell death: programmed cell death, or apoptosis, and non-programmed cell death, or necrosis. Apoptosis is a type of cell death that is characterized by a number of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and blebbing of the plasma membrane. These changes are accompanied by biochemical changes, such as the activation of caspases and the cleavage of nuclear DNA. Apoptosis is a highly regulated process that is essential for the development, tissue homeostasis, and the prevention of disease. Necrosis is a type of cell death that is characterized by cell lysis and the release of cellular contents into the extracellular space. Necrosis is often associated with tissue damage and inflammation. Unlike apoptosis, necrosis is not a regulated process and can be caused by a variety of factors, including infection, ischemia, and toxicity. Cell death is a complex process that is regulated by a variety of factors. The balance between cell death and cell survival is critical for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and the prevention of disease.